Care Act in Senate
The following message was posted by Michael Wyland to several nonprofit-sector discussion lists on Friday, January 31, 2003:

To all:

The “faith-based” issue is now back before Congress. S. 272, The Charity Aid, Recovery and Empowerment, (CARE) Act of 2003 was introduced yesterday by Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA), with Sen. Joe Lieberman (D-CT) as prime co-sponsor. [Note the reversing in the sponsorship order from the 2002 bill.]

Click here for the full text of the bill in Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format.

From yesterday's [Thu, 1/30/2003] Congressional Record, pages S1835-1836:

By Mr. SANTORUM (for himself, Mr. LIEBERMAN, Mr. GRASSLEY, Mr. BAYH, Mr. HATCH, Ms. LANDRIEU, Mr. SMITH, Mr. NELSON of Florida, Mr. TALENT, Mr. LUGAR, Mr. FRIST, and Mr. MILLER)

Also from the Congressional Record (see link above), Sen. Santorum's remarks squarely target Sen. Daschle's interest (or lack thereof) in the bill:

The CARE Act was introduced in the last Congress and was considered by the Senate Finance Committee but was never debated on the floor of the Senate because of repeated objections to unanimous consent requests to bring up the bill.

The CARE Act is supported by both Democrats and Republicans. The time has come to get this legislation on the President's desk as he has repeatedly called for. The Senate Majority Leader, TOM DASCHLE, wrote shortly after the bill's introduction last year that ''the CARE Act is not a Republican or Democratic plan. it is a bipartisan proposal that strikes the right balance between harnessing the best forces of faith in our public life without infringing on the First Amendment . . . I look forward to working with President Bush and my congressional colleagues to get this proposal signed into law.''

Sen. Daschle was not a cosponsor of last year's bill and is not currently a cosponsor of S. 272. As Majority Leader in 2002, he controlled the legislative schedule and (among other reported roadblocks) mandated that CARE could only come to the floor under unanimous consent. Sen. Grassley's and Sen. Frist's co-sponsorship of the bill, as Senate Finance chairman and Senate Majority Leader, respectively, is an encouraging sign that the bill will, at least, reach the Senate floor for debate this year.